Do We Understand Our Sufferings?

We are imprisoned by the event that caused us so much damage. It becomes overpowering and causes us so much suffering.

Sometimes we perceive our challenges as negative event and sometimes we get upset by an insult or hurt through thoughtless remarks. At that moment, we are imprisoned by the event that caused us so much damage. It becomes overpowering and causes us so much suffering.

Even though we are surrounded by good, we forget them at the moment of distress. We are blindfolded by the wounds and scars that had left by others.

Even though we are surrounded by good, we forget them at the moment of distress. We are blindfolded by the wounds and scars that had left by others. Their ability to make us believe them and then suddenly in their recklessness, caused us to be bitter.

But wait, we also had done the same to others. And each of us had been responsible to others hurt and brokenness.

But wait, we also had done the same to others. And each of us had been responsible to others hurt and brokenness. And the redemption that lies ahead of us is invisible because of what we are experiencing at the moment.

We wanted to believe that because we have faith we should belong to the people that also hope for goodness sake. But we don’t see it anymore because we have been surrounded by pain and suffering. And we are mostly sorry for ourselves because it makes us feel alone. Truth is, other people feel the same.

We had been given a redemption. To experience that in suffering we have the abilities to gain a better understanding and earn wisdom to fill the role of being a royalty in the kingdom of God.

Geulah, “redemption,” on the other hand, is seeing the wholeness and the core G‑dliness within creation. It is the understanding of the connecting thread, the Divine force going through everything—people, places and events. It is viewing each event as leading up to a purpose, having a mission and fulfillment; and understanding that it will reach the grand finale when all these loose ends will be wholesomely tied together.

Mitzvah (commandment) means connection. Every mitzvot uncovers the concealed purpose of this time or of this created matter, and thereby connects us to our God. It reminds us that we are here to serve an essential purpose, and that every experience is necessary and meaningful—even those that may cause us such distress, pain and sorrow—in bringing about a good result to a glorious future.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.